Among the wide variety of kitchen sinks available today few materials have earned a top spot like Cast Iron.  Cast Iron sinks have been around for some time, because they're long lasting and attractive. And today they're available in a wide variety of colors, styles and price ranges. Self Rimming cast iron sinks are DIY-friendly, but may require more caulk to seal the gaps between the countertop and the sink. A drop-in cast iron sink installation will cost less than an undermount cast iron sink installation, which is more labor-intensive.

The Basics: Cast Iron kitchen sinks are composed of two layers. The foundation layer is a heavy, durable iron alloy, which is then coated in a thick enamel top layer. Together the layers create an impervious surface with a lustrous finish.

Advantages: When it comes to durability and attractiveness, a Cast Iron sink certainly fits the bill. A heavy foundation means these sinks can take a lifetime of use. The material retains heat well, which is a benefit when washing a lot of dishes by hand.

In addition to their durability, these sinks also boast an attractive finish. The thick enamel top layer has a beautiful glossy sheen. It's most often white, but it can be done in a range of colors.

cast iron sink

Sustainability: Most Cast Iron sinks are made from a high percentage, often 80 percent or more, of recycled and reclaimed iron, making them an excellent choice for the ecology responsible consumer.

Maintenance: The polished enamel surface is nonporous, making for a stain resistant and easy-to-clean sink. They are very easy to clean and their smooth, glossy finish helps hide water spots and streaks.  A thorough rinsing and wipe-down with a soft cloth is recommended after each use. Avoid abrasive cleaners and tools, which can dull or scratch the finish.

 

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